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IRS warns yet again on scam artist trickery

Discussion in 'Network World' started by RSS, Aug 7, 2015.

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    RSS New Member Member

    The IRS this week said some 4,000 victims have lost over $20 million to scammers and the rip-offs continue at a startling pace.

    +More on Network World: FBI and IRS warn of pervasive, maddening business, consumer scams+

    The IRS noted what it called a number of new variations on old schemes:

    • Scammers alter what appears on your telephone caller ID to make it seem like they are with the IRS or another agency such as the Department of Motor Vehicles. They use fake names, titles and badge numbers. They use online resources to get your name, address and other details about your life to make the call sound official. They even go as far as copying official IRS letterhead for use in email or regular mail.
    • Brazen scammers will even provide their victims with directions to the nearest bank or business where the victim can obtain a means of payment such as a debit card. And in another new variation of these scams, con artists may then provide an actual IRS address where the victim can mail a receipt for the payment – all in an attempt to make the scheme look official.
    • Scammers try to scare people into reacting immediately without taking a moment to think through what is actually happening.
    • Scam artists often angrily threaten police arrest, deportation, license revocation or other similarly unpleasant things. They may also leave “urgent” callback requests, sometimes through “robo-calls,” via phone or email. The emails will often contain a fake IRS document with a telephone number or email address for your reply.

    The IRS said it is important to remember the official IRS website is IRS.gov. Taxpayers are urged not to be confused or misled by sites claiming to be the IRS but ending in .com, .net, .org or other designations instead of .gov. Taxpayers should never provide personal information, financial or otherwise, to suspicious websites or strangers calling out of the blue.

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