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Dridex banking malware adds a new trick

Discussion in 'Network World' started by RSS, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. RSS

    RSS New Member Member

    Dridex, the banking malware that won't go away, has been improved upon once again.

    IBM's X-Force researchers have found that the latest version of Dridex uses a DNS (Domain Name System) trick to direct victims to fake banking websites.

    The technique, known as DNS cache poisoning, involves changing DNS settings to direct someone asking for a legitimate banking website to a fake site.

    DNS cache poisoning is a powerful attack. Even if a person types in the correct domain name for a bank, the fake website is still shown in the browser.

    "By keeping the victim away from the bank’s site, the fraudster can deceive them into divulging critical authentication codes without the bank knowing that the customer’s session has been compromised," wrote Limor Kessem, a cybersecurity expert with IBM's Trusteer division, in a blog post on Tuesday.

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